Robotemi is adding Alexa to its personal telepresence robot

Robotemi, the company behind Temi, will add the functionality once Amazon releases its Alexa Smart Screen and TV Device SDK. It’s not clear, however, if the startup will be replacing its entire operating system, called Temi OS, with the one used by Echo Show products, or merely supplementing it with Amazon services. Adopting the Alexa […]

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Foldable phone maker shows off flexible keyboard at CES 2019 – CNET

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Royole’s flexible keyboard.


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Even before arriving at CES 2019, Royole made headlines in November when it launched the FlexPai — a 7.8-inch phone with a flexible AMOLED screen — during a time when Samsung was only rumored to do the same.

It was hard to imagine that this largely unknown startup managed to make, let alone sell, such a product before Samsung and other giants like LG and Huawei were able to debut their own. (Samsung did eventually give a sneak peak of its foldable phone a month later.)

Riding the hype of that launch, Royole is at CES 2019 showing off not only the FlexPai but several other devices that implement thin, foldable displays. Namely, a smart speaker, a flexible keyboard and a smart-touch selfie stick.

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The smart speaker has a 7.8-inch AMOLED touchscreen that bends at 100 degrees. You can swipe through the screen to play music, watch movies or just tap the interactive home screen.

Though it wasn’t set up while we were taking a look at it, the speaker also has an 8-megapixel camera up top that pops up and rotates 180 degrees for taking pictures and video calls. The speaker is also integrated with Alexa and Google, so you can ask it different queries and command it to control your smart home devices.

Royole demoed its flexible QWERTY keyboard as well, which can be laid on any smooth surface and connected to your phone via Bluetooth. It can work wirelessly and when you’re done, push the button twice and it’ll roll up so you can carry it around in your pocket. On standby I’m told its battery lasts for months. Though it was a little hard to type on, it looks really cool and the transparent surface is thin and flexible.  

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Royole’s smart speaker has a curved touchscreen.


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Royole’s selfie stick has touch sensors for navigation around its handle.


Sarah Tew/CNET

Lastly, the company showed off its smart-touch selfie stick. It’s already available in China at Brookstone stores, and is expected to come to the US in 2019. It features multi-touch sensors around the handle. This allows you to navigate through a dedicated camera app so you can switch between different editing features on the phone.

Official pricing has not been announced yet, but Royole plans to sell the flexible keyboard globally by Q2 2019 through its site and other retailers like Amazon. As for the smart speaker, Royole is still reaching out to retail partners for distribution.

Royole also brought along two other devices that are already available on its site and Amazon: the digital writing pad RoWrite and an immersive 3D movie headset called Moon. They retail for $130 (£102 and AU$183, converted) and $600 (£471 and AU$842), respectively.

CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.

CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect.

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Tech review: Apple Mac mini feels underpowered for its price – The Straits Times

The Apple Mac mini (2018) is probably the most-anticipated Mac computer, as its previous update was way back in 2014.

First launched in 2005, the Mac mini was marketed as a low-cost Mac machine for those switching from the Windows platform. It does not come with a mouse and keyboard, as the idea is to let the Windows switchers use their current peripherals.

The Mac mini’s basic design has gone relatively unchanged through four generations. The 2018 version continues to have a squarish aluminium unibody, which measures 19.7cm x 19.7cm and is only 3.6cm thick. Weighing just 1.3kg, it can be easily lifted and shifted around the table.

But the latest model comes in a space-grey finish, instead of the silver of the 2014 model. Personally, I prefer the space-grey look.

At its rear are four Thunderbolt 3 ports, two USB 3.0 ports, a HDMI 2.0 port, an Ethernet port and a 3.5mm headphone jack. Gone are the SD card slot and Thunderbolt 2 ports that are found in the 2014 model.

Internally, there has been a re-design, with a bigger fan and larger air vents for better cooling. It also now uses conventional system memory slots, so users can upgrade the memory. With the 2014 model, system memory cannot be upgraded as they are permanently soldered to the motherboard.

But Apple advises that users should not perform such upgrades on their own, but rather get qualified technicians to do so.

  • SPECS

    Price: From $1,179

    Processor: From eighth-generation Intel Core i3 3.6GHz quad-core processor (Up to Intel Core i7 3.2GHz six-core processor)

    Graphics: Intel UHD Graphics 630

    System memory: From 8GB (up to 64GB)

    Storage: From 128GB SSD (up to 2TB SSD)

    Ports: 4 x Thunderbolt 3, 1 x HDMI 2.0, 2 x USB 3.0, 1 x Ethernet

    Weight: 1.3kg

    RATING

    Features: 4/5

    Design: 5/5

    Performance: 3/5

    Value for money: 3/5

    Overall: 4/5

The review unit is the entry-level model, with 8GB of system memory and 128GB of solid-state drive (SSD) storage. Both specifications are pretty meagre by today’s computing standard.

Not to mention, the new Mac mini only comes with the Intel UHD Graphics 630 integrated graphics processing unit, which is not exactly a powerhouse.

Nonetheless, performance is not too shabby. In the Geekbench 4 benchmark tests, the review unit scored 4,723 points (single-core) and 14,436 points (multi-core) – better than a latest MacBook Air with comparable specifications which scored 3,690 (single-core) and 7,831 (multi-core).

For daily computing tasks like web surfing, word processing, backing up your iPhone and the occasional photo editing work with apps such as Pixelmator, the Mac mini is more than adequate.

If you want use the Mac mini for serious video editing or gaming, consider getting the BlackMagic eGPU ($1,149) external graphic processing unit that features a Radeon Pro 580 graphics card with 8GB of video memory.

The only real downer of the new Mac mini is its price-to-specs ratio. While the review entry-level model costs only $1,179, a fully souped-up version with a better Intel Core i7 processor, 64GB of system memory and 2TB of SSD storage will set you back a staggering $5,819. Comparatively, you can get the top model of the21.5-inch Retina iMac (with 1TB SSD) for $4,008.

That said, if all you need is a Mac for basic daily computing, you can always customise the Mac mini with 16GB of system memory and 1TB of SSD storage at a more affordable $2,739.

Verdict: The Apple Mac mini (2018) might be a tad under-powered for its price. But if you don’t have much table top space or just need a basic Mac, the Mac mini is still the best thing to get.

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This standing desk with a built-in PC is the workstation of your dreams – The Verge

The ideal workstation depends on who you ask, and whether that person prefers more monitors or just one and just how much clutter they’re comfortable with. But the closest approximation to most modern office workers’ dream workstation is probably the Cemtrex SmartDesk, an absurdly over-featured, three-monitor adjustable standing desk with a built-in Windows PC and a dizzying number of other integrated features.

The desk made the rounds online earlier this year, but we actually got to try it ourselves here at CES, and it’s actually quite a stellar setup. For one, you get three, 24-inch IP{S touchscreens to work with. (No 4K, unfortunately.) But on top of that, Cemtrex put a pretty solid keyboard, trackpad, and even a Leap Motion gesture control module in the middle.

That way, you can work either with your hands directly on the touchscreen, on the keyboard / trackpad, or just waving in midair, thanks to the custom gesture controls Cemtrex built specifically for the SmartDesk’s Leap Motion integration. Some nifty gesture features include two-handed zoom in / out and a two-finger website and document scroll.

On top of that, the right side of the desk has a Qi wireless charger, while the left side has built-in wireless headphones the company designed itself that come bundled in with the whole package. (Cemtrex imagines they’d be used as a replacement for an office phone, so you’d take all of your work calls via the PC using the wireless earbuds.) They didn’t stop there, either. There’s a document scanner that worked perfectly with two taps in our demo, presumably for the type of office worker that still works in physical documents and would otherwise just use their smartphone or an office printer for the same job.

As for the actual specs of the PC, it’s pretty standard, but nothing to scoff at when it comes to performance. The base model comes with an Intel 8th Gen i7, 16GB of RAM, a 256GB SSD, a 1TB HDD, and a Nvidia GTX 1050. The beefier configuration gets you the same Intel processor and SSD, but 32GB of RAM, a 2TB HDD, and a GTX 1060. So that’s not a bad PC to come bundled with three touchscreen monitors and a standing desk, all for either $4,500 for the base model and $5,700 for the higher-priced config.

What makes the whole thing actually attractive, and not just an overwhelming mess, is just how integrated everything is. The PC stays out of the way underneath the main center piece of the desk, while the keyboard and trackpad are built directly in and not just bundled together, where they’d need to be plugged in with extra wires. And the whole rig requires just one wire to make it all work, which drastically reduces the amount of clutter you’d get if you were to recreate something even remotely like this at home with off-the-shelf parts.

That said, this isn’t for your average consumer at a price point like that. Cemtrex says it designed the desk mostly for well-off, work-at-home types and C-suite executives with a penchant for minimalist aesthetics. But it’s also seen interest from companies that think the SmartDesk might work well in an office layout — even with two, three, or more configured together in cubicle-style pods.

The company won’t say how many units they’ve shipped already, but the product is available now. Cemtrex also says there’s a trade-in program in the works, so you can get the whole SmartDesk swapped out for a new one with better displays and a more powerful PC down the line. (The company said you could theoretically unmount the PC from the desk and upgrade it yourself, but it may void the warranty.)

Still, for as many goofy standing desk prototypes and experimental workstations there are at CES, it’s always refreshing to see one you’d actually like to buy — if you had nearly $5,000 to burn. So while I certainly won’t be buying this, I sure do wish The Verge would outfit our office with one.

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HP Ink Tank 419: Forget ink woes and print at 10 paise per page (Tech Review) – Business Standard

In a society that is increasingly becoming paperless, a home printer is still top on a parent’s mind — both for homework as well as the experiential learning needs of their children.


Beyond facilitating homework prints, a consumer-grade printer today has to be a cost-efficient device that is wireless, can be connected from a smartphone and helps in running a small business.

Now imagine a printer that does not need ink to be replaced even after months!

HP Inc, a leader in the consumer printing space, has brought Ink Tank Wireless 415 and 419 — targeted at the millennial parents as well as micro, small and medium enterprise (MSME) users — to the country.

Priced at Rs 15,493, the HP Ink Tank 419 claims to print up to 8,000 coloured pages or 15,000 black and white pages with ease.

The device has fade-resistant ink technology which lasts 22 times longer than any other material users for businesses.

Let us see what the iOS and Android-enabled HP Ink Tank 419 has to offer.

Weighing 4.7 kg with a low-profile height and width and an elegant exterior, the Ink Tank 419 has the control panel situated left to the scanner lid.

The printer has a control panel with icon LCD display and copy counter, flatbed scanner that handles letter/A4 pages with up to 60-sheet input tray.

The device uses a special kind of ink that is water and fade resistant. The ink is refilled with the new spill-free refill system where bottles are directly plugged into the printer and you do not need to squeeze those.

The printer ships with a two-year spill-proof supply of ink. Each colour bottle is 70ml, while there are two black ink bottles of 170 ml each (as black is used more).

With built-in USB, Wi-Fi Direct and wireless networking, you can print from your smartphone, scan on the go, and easily order ink with the HP Smart app.

The HP Smart app will allow you to quickly send scans to email or Cloud storage through mobile devices.

The Wi-Fi Direct function can be used by a variety of mobile devices, including iPhones and iPads using AirPrint, or smartphones and tablets running Android, Windows 8 or Windows 10.

The Google Chrome operating system enables users to print from anywhere in the office, even without a wireless network.

You can not only quickly access and print photos on your smartphone, from social media, the Cloud and camera-roll gallery but also scan files using your camera, and share to email or the Cloud from virtually anywhere.

Not just for home use, the printer is also suitable for MSMEs with high-volume printing needs.

What does not work?

Overall, the printer is made too delicate and it seems any rough use will break it apart (including touch buttons. But it looks great though.

Conclusion: No more secret printing in office for your personal needs as you can now print at just 10 paise per page with HP Ink Tank.

The value-for-money printer definitely stands out among the crowd of Ink Tank devices — both for high-volume printing needs as well as home use.

(Nishant Arora can be contacted at nishant.a@ians.in)

–IANS

na/gb/vm

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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The world’s first real foldable phone is rough around the edges – Engadget

For those who haven’t been keeping track, the FlexPai packs a Snapdragon 855 chipset (since it’s already on sale, this probably counts as the world’s first commercially available 855 phone), either 6 or 8GB of RAM, 128GB or 256GB of storage and 16MP+20MP dual camera. Oh, and it even runs Android 9.0 Pie (albeit a version loaded with plenty of tweaks to make tablet mode work).On paper, that’s enough to put the FlexPai squarely in flagship territory, but who are we kidding? All that really matters there is the 7.8-inch AMOLED display that folds in half to form a usable — if kind of unwieldy — smartphone. All told, it doesn’t get much more bleeding edge than this.

This isn’t the first time the FlexPai has broken cover — it went on a world tour of sorts in late 2018. The difference is, the device wasn’t quite ready for production back then, and it definitely showed. At CES, though, the company is showing off production models that actually work pretty well. There’s a very specific kind of joy that manifests when you unfold a phone into a tiny tablet, and during our hands-on time with the thing, I found myself opening and closing often just because I could. (In fairness, I did the same with the decidedly non-flexible Axon M.)

The FlexPai’s novelty is almost intoxicating, and in an era where samey-same devices are impossible to avoid, there’s something to be said for pushing envelopes. It’s a tablet! It’s a phone! At the same time! What’s not to like?

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Applying The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations

FoldUnfold Table of Contents Applying The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations Example 1 Applying The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations Be sure to review the following pages regarding The Fixed Point method for solving systems of two nonlinear equations: The Fixed Point Method for Solving […]

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The Algorithm for The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations

FoldUnfold Table of Contents The Algorithm for The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations The Algorithm for The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations We will now summarize The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations in the following algorithm. Let $left{begin{matrix} f(x, y) […]

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Convergence of The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations

FoldUnfold Table of Contents Convergence of The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations Convergence of The Fixed Point Method for Solving Systems of Two Nonlinear Equations We will now develop criterion to ensure that the successive iterations converge to $(alpha, beta)$. If $(alpha, beta)$ is a solution to the system prescribed […]

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